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20130103
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
to being destroyed by a mob of patriots because ben franklin showed sentiments of moderation in compliance with the stamp act. he appointed a friend of his to be a stamp master and those sentiments of compliance and moderation come through in the newspapers. for instance benjamin franklin printed the pennsylvania gazette in 172-92-1748. for the next 16 years until 1758 he remained a business partner wear on the back of every pennsylvania gazette it's filled with his name printed by d. franklin and dee hull. while he didn't, was inactive in the daily printing business, it still carried his name and that pennsylvania gazette was one of the first principles texts of the stamp that. that in sylvania cassettes just a few weeks later was also advertising for franklin's poor richman almanacs which in the 1776 edition were promoting is having the fold text of the stamp act which all columns should be familiar with because it will affect you all. there in those newspapers accompaniments you start to see sentiment of moderation. also the boston tea party, this is the december 21, 1773 gazette printe
of individual americans. and we all remember the wonderful comment by ben franklin -- i will paraphrase it -- but essentially ben franklin said that if you give up your liberty to have security, you really don't deserve either. and so we owe it to the hardworking men and women in the intelligence community to work closely with them to find that kind of balance that ben franklin was talking about, and we can help them do it by conducting robust oversight, roy bust oversight -- robust oversight over the work that's being done there so that members of the public can have confidence in the important work being done by the men and women in the intelligence community and confidence that, as we protect our security at a dangerous time, we are also protecting the individual liberties of our people. now, mr. president, the story with respect to this debate really begins in early america when the colonists were famously subjected to a lot of taxes by the british government. the american colonists thought thathat this was unfair because they were not represented in the british parliament, and they
hires ben moster to hide any indication she's been involved. the most important when clinton who knows he's in trouble brings on david goringen. he served three different presidents all republicans. a pivot toll figure in washington politics. clinton brings him on to build bridges to the washington community the establishment. and david negotiates the deal with "the washington post and the deal is that the clintons will make available to the post all of the paper around white water including papers from the rose law firm. and if they find nothing criminal then the papers they will promise to completely defend the integrity of the clintons and wipe away the scandal. bill clinton said that's a good idea. george steph stephanopoulos said there's a good idea. most people said it's a good idea. bill said so you to ask hilary and hilary said no, those are my papers i can throw them in the river if i want to. i will not make them available. that's in december of 1993. the consequences are immeasurable. immediately "the washington post and "new york times" organizes huge campaigns of investiga
a white friend. a man named ben lundy, eye tern rant editor, traveled around the country, a familiar face for me. and he an anti-slavery newspaper, called the genius of universal emancipation. he would travel most of the newspapers of the day the msm, really avoided the slavery issue. they would report on the politics of it you about they didn't really want to get into it. then lundy weren't and the country, he reported there was a killing. this man was beat. here is how the slaves escaped. here is how the churches have caved in. he did really investigative reporting about slavery, quite unprecedented at the time. anti-slavery sentiment as the movement starts to grow in washington he has enough money to hire a new assistant. he hires a promising young man from boston named william lloyd garrison a and he teaches william lloyd garrison you how to be journalist and report about slavery. benjamin lundy died in obsecurity and william lloyd garrison became one of the most influential abolitionists and journalists of the 19th century. he is a character in this book too. another thing you probab
. something even as simple as your friends can make a difference.ls edin the past years, there's ben highs and lows in twitter, andd yo've seen the arab spring.d, we've seen the un, you know, settling events around general petraeus and congressman wieners and use of social networks can wreak havoc in your life. unlike vegas, what happens onli. facebook, doesn't stay ons, what facebook. here's the toop five don'tsi'm g currently. number one, ifon you are a male judge, don't friend the hot sex' female defendant and tell her how to plead in your courtroom on facebook. don' was done by a 54-year-old judge in georgia, and it was uncovered these hundreds of messages between him and a defendant in the courtroom, including one agreeing to pay part of her rent, and anotherinl one where she offer him a year't worth of free massages and saids "lol, i'm not really trying tond bribe you." [laughter] aloud, i number two, if you're a bigamist, don't let wife number two post your new wedding photo on facebook in a place where wife number one will see it. [laughter]whoto that happened. one married john in
, but every day we had this not in our stomach and would like to get over it. we heard ben shapiro speak to us and he said we've got to go after the media. it's time for him. he's got that forum, but what can we be sitting here and going home to her normal lives? >> well, who's to stop you from mocking them wherever you want to go? i'm lucky i can say whatever i want. you can tell me what to say. recently that's it people do if they find me and say you have to say this. sometimes i actually say it. but the whole thing is to keep good humor and know that you're right. you always have to know that you're right and not be shaken. [applause] >> we've got time for tumor questions. >> i was wondering if you could tell people like myself who has been a leading liberal within 100 miles of him how you possibly influence those people. >> basically the only way -- it sounds kind of erika, but aoa clec i never felt left and right with a horizontal relationship. i whistle it was vertical, that you start your end of that. it's not original idea. the old line is what is a conservative? a liberal who's been m
of harpercollins. [applause] ben fountain, billy lynn's long -- [inaudible] [applause] published by echo press, an imprint of harpercollins. kevin powers, the yellow bird. published by little brown. [applause] the 2012 national book award for fiction dose -- goes to "the round house", by louise erdrich. [applause] ♪ ♪ hey, baby, where are you is? [laughter] [applause] [laughter] >> wow. hello, my relatives. [speaking in native tongue] national book foundation and also the judges, and a shout out for all of the native people who are watching this live stream. [applause] i want to thank harpercollins. it's not each a huge company anymore -- can it's not even a huge company anymore. [laughter] but it's always been about four or five people to me. people who believed so strongly in my work that they've supported me and my family and literature. my bookstore and all of us who work there through these years. i want to thank my editor, terry cardin, for believing in the book. [applause] jonathan burnham, jane byrne, jim duffy, i want to thank andrew wily and jim ott. [applause] i want to sa
seats which is how the following happened. amen named ben davis, benjamin davis won s c and city council of new york in the 1940s. you might be interested in two aspect of benjamin davis, city council member. he was black. he was an african-american and he was an enthusiastic public leader of the united states communist party and he was elected because of proportional representation. shortly after that proportional representation was ended. new democracy came in first, they had twenty-eight%. ari arizahad 24 or something close. under greek law whatever party comes in first gets not only the percentage of the popular vote that is won but an extra 50. that is the only reason there the government in greece now because they got it by this rule which is designed to favor the party that comes in first. you had a knife edge situation in greece. in addition to the sariza party their deep rooted greek communist party that got 8% of the vote typically so you have 24, one third of the voters in greece voted extreme left wing hostility not just to this crisis but to the capitalist system of greece
with nebraska senator ben nelson who is retiring after two terms. >>> retiring senator nebraska ben tell me sop. years that began with the 2003 recount and reended with re-election of president obama. if you could think of the adjective to describe these years what would it be? >> clearly interesting. challenging. sometimes totally frustrating. but also full of opportunities for the country. there was some good times during the twelve years laced together with some that weren't so good. 9/11, the anthrax scare. there were positive things as well, the election of president obama, i thought it was a positive statement for the country and moving forward in a way that we have tried to move forward out of face -- fiscal as by now we came out of a fiscal as by during the times. it's a hodgepodge during at love different things. i couldn't imagined to have been here during a better time. >> let me get deeper and ask you tell me what was the high point of the entire service? >> the high point was when we can work together. and maybe the single event that process that would embody that was the gang of f
are a fierce believer in independence of thought, and dissent, and not even george washington or ben franklin might've had a complete monopoly on all of this so it was usual that you had at george mason critiquing it. >> i think george mason seems like a pretty stubborn guy. the other thing was that you know, i think that he made it clear, he did not undermine the process. if you go back and look at the last days, george mason did not throw a monkey wrench into the works. what he did was he made it clear. he made it absolutely clear, he had his list of objections. he thought you needed a bill of rights. he was not a politician. he had -- he was not into making a lot of friends and allies. he was going to argue his point and then he was going to return. i happen to think that was pretty effective. he wasn't against it. remember he was very helpful in developing the constitution, with a strong national government. but, he wanted to build this wall that would make it clear that did not exist in sort of contradiction or in opposition to these individual rights. again, he wasn't cynical. he wasn't
. before the election we had a hearing to -- barry on write-in votes. held by senator ben in florida and ohio. we are testament about the renewed effort in many states, denied millions of americans access to the ballot box and voter identification laws. i was concerned these barriers would stand between millions of americans an about box. what we saw during the election showed that we are right to be concerned. purges of voter rolls, restrictions on voter registration, limitations under early voting, which in previous elections in april millions to vote. lead to unnecessary problems on election day. you had owners confusing requirement, competition in places like pennsylvania. arizona, texas, south carolina. throughout the country, political advertising, robocall's were so confusion and suppressed the vote. just because millions of americans successfully overcame a abusive practices in order to cast their ballot, that doesn't make these practices right. does not justify the burdens that prevented millions more from being able to vote. barriers are reminders of the time when discrimin
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)